Infant Mortality & Immoral Cash Cows

Infant Mortality Rate Black Denver

Colorado is a healthy state, with the fewest obese people and the fifth lowest infant mortality rate in the nation; but the odds of making it to your first birthday are better if you are born in rural Cuba. Even more shocking: A black child born to a middle class family in Denver faces an 18% greater risk of infant death than a child born in Libya – ground zero for ISIS.

Child ISIS

 

The US has the largest GDP in the world, but the shameful truth is that 57 countries and the entire European Union have a lower infant mortality rate than us.  What they all have in common is Universal Health Care – the desire to provide all citizens with basic health insurance, and protect them financially from the burdens of illness or accidents.

 

Amendment 69

 

This November Coloradans will get to vote on Amendment 69. I’m hoping we choose to show the United States how Universal Health Care works. Colorado has successfully implemented the country’s most progressive ideas and, in some cases, even made them profitable. Our quality of life is unparalleled due to forward thinking and planning, and the willingness to pay a bit more to ensure it stays that way.

 

Light Rail

 

Denver’s Rapid Transit system of commuter trains, light rail, bike highways and paths, buses, HOV and HOT lanes has been named the finest in North America. Our State Parks, Natural and Wildlife areas are the envy of the world, providing access to millions of acres of spectacular wilderness. Decades ago Colorado’s cities and counties set aside funds to buy hundreds of thousands of acres of open space, as well as money to develop and maintain City Parks and Recreation Districts. By 2025 our ‘Colorado the Beautiful’ project will ensure that every resident will live no more than a 10 minute walk from a park, a trail or open space. Proposition 64 has been a model for how to intelligently implement legalization, and has brought the state $135 million in direct taxes and fees in 2015 alone, and helped increase tourism to 72 million visitors who spent more than $20 billion dollars.

It is natural that Colorado embrace Universal Healthcare so that we can further secure our superior quality of life. We wouldn’t be reinventing the wheel – rather, we can implement the kind of health care delivery system that works all over the world, and costs less than our current system.

Unfortunately, Amendment 69 getting on the ballot means Colorado is getting pummeled with astroturf movements: the fake political groups which are made to look like grass roots activism. They look local, but are entirely invented and well-funded by the Big 5 health insurance companies (United Healthcare, Anthem, CIGNA, Humana, & Aetna). The Big 5 *need* single payer not to work here, because that would be the end of them.

Their big cry is the cost: By focusing on what will surely be at least 8 figures for Colorado alone, they are ignoring that we’re ALREADY paying more than any other industrialized country in the world for health care – and not everyone is covered. In fact, we’re the only developed nation in the world without universal health insurance. Moreover, the Big 5’s stock values have quadrupled in last 5 years, making them $14+ BILLION in profits in the last year – and an average projected 5-year growth rate of 12% annually. The resistance is them seeing their obscene profits and stock values dry up. These are the same companies that used to cancel the policies of the sick and those who would *dare* to use their benefits. Remember the wailing and gnashing of teeth about how Obamacare forcing them to cover pre-existing conditions would destroy profits? Tell me how that worked out as they generate $45 *per second* in profit.

I find it unscrupulous and ethically repugnant that these businesses have a model based on squeezing as much as they can from sick and dying people. It’s immoral – and I think our way of providing health care should be viewed as profiteering and should be made illegal.

In an effort to hold on to their cash cows, the Big 5 insurance companies will misdirect attention from their obscene profits by invoking the politics of envy, and trotting out the Red Herring of the ‘Zero Sum Game’ fallacy. That’s the despicable practice of telling one group they will get less if another group gets something more. It is a contemptible lie that economic systems are incapable of growth, but too often it is an effective one.

 

With Universal Health Care some will pay more, of course. Some will pay less. But, all will be covered. Doesn’t a just and civilized society take care of the least among us? Who wants to live in a country where we let the poor die from easily treatable diseases – or those not so easily treated? Who yearns to live in a country where the wealthiest among us is at greater risk of dying in our first year than children born in countries synonymous with genocide?

Our GDP is $1.5 trillion bigger than the entire European Union’s combined. That gap represents more than the current GDP of Australia, yet the EU manages to fund universal health care and paid parental leave for more than half-a-billion people (compared to our 318 million) – and their infant mortality rate is 47% lower than ours. Hell, even Australia has universal health care and paid family leave – and their infant mortality rate is 34% lower than ours!

Healthcare is a right for all, and not one that is based on a tax bracket – just like the right to clean water and air, and the right to free speech. The United States is the only developed country in the world that doesn’t recognize that right, and Colorado is working to change that with Amendment 69.

Amendment 69 3

In an effort to sew fear the Big 5 lobby is flogging the idea of ‘Rationed Care’. Care is already rationed: It is entirely rationed AWAY from the uninsured. It is rationed from people who face paperwork designed to discourage them, multi-hour telephone wait times, and web sites with outdated information and broken links. Care is rationed with the automatic rejection of a doctor’s order for a procedure or expensive medication; when a perfectly valid medical directive is over-ridden by a policy written by an accountant and the appeal is handled by an uncompassionate desk jockey who never went to med school. Care is rationed at most doctors’ offices where hour-plus wait times to get into the exam room are common. It already takes months to see a specialist, and days to get an appointment with a GP for a serious issue. If you need help urgently you are encouraged to go to the ER, which generates a multi-thousand dollar bill the moment you walk in the door. Make no mistake – we *do* ration our health care, and not very well.

Will it have problems? Of course it will. Any new business, cabinet or venture has rough patches. But, Good is not the enemy of Perfect. We should not forgo making things better because we cannot attain absolute perfection. I see this as an attempt to move forward, and a way to take the Big 5 insurance companies and their unethical profits out of our Right to Life.

As for those who call this Unconstitutional? Please go back and read your Preamble: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are LIFE, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. — That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed”.

It’s right there in black and white: In order to protect our Inalienable Right to Life the Government (notice the capital G) may create institutions through the will of the people to secure our Right to Health.

Amendment 69 means my inalienable Right to Life supersedes any insurance company’s Right to Profit, and Coloradans can finally take medical profiteering away from the Big Insurance.

The question is will Coloradans embrace universal health care as a right if it benefits the poor?

Too many people would rather cut off their nose to spite their face, in that even though it would be cheaper and it would lower our infant mortality rate they would reject universal coverage because it would mean the poor might get something ‘they didn’t pay for’.

If we pool our resources we can cover everyone for less than the majority of us are paying now. Sadly, there are many Americans who don’t want equality and just want to punish the poor – or, at the very least have the poor ‘know their place’.

Ultimately, the question Americans need to answer is: Are we OK with the fact that a child born in Beirut has a better chance of seeing its first birthday than a child born in Washington, D.C.?

 

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